THR Partners

THR Partners, Executive Search Firm specializing in the HVAC, Appliance, and Commercial Restaurant Equipment Industries

January 2015
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  • Message

    When you answer job postings on websites or job boards, you are competing against hundreds or even thousands of other job seekers. Your Resume/CV is often screened out by automated systems that search for specific keywords. Job postings represent the highest level of competition with the lowest level of return on your time and efforts.

    When you get your Resume/CV in the hands of a hiring authority who is not conducting an active job search, your Resume/CV is the only one on their desk.

    Often hiring authorities are:

    • Not satisfied with someone on their team, but have taken no action
    • Have an opening but haven’t taken time to interview
    • Facing an upcoming project that will require additional hiring
    • Had someone just quit or fired
    • Have a skill they desire – one that is missing from their current team

    When they review your Resume/CV, it is easy for them to take action when they see the experience and skills they currently need.

    One of the best ways to stand out from other job seekers and impress your potential employer is to show them your knowledge of the company and the industry. Make it your mission to find out as much as you can about the companies where you would like to work and conduct your due diligence on their leadership, products, services, significant projects, and competitors.

    Demonstrate your commitment and sincerity by asking concise, focused and clear questions about the company. The hiring authorities will see you as someone who is noticeably interested, proactive and serious about the job and the organization which enhances your credibility.

    Marketing yourself to potential hiring authorities at your targeted companies should become part of your daily job search routine.

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  • The hidden job market refers to opportunities that are not advertised to the general public or included on the employment pages of a company’s website. These employment opportunities are usually accessed through an inside connection who is aware of the opportunity before the job is officially announced. These opportunities can be the result of:

    1. Employee resignation or termination
    2. Leave of Absence
    3. Unexpected retirement
    4. New products or services
    5. Internal reorganization
    6. Expansion or new facility
    7. Merger or Acquisition

    These job leads are passed along through a network of contacts. They may include existing positions or positions that could be created for the right person. This hidden job market is accessed through people who know about the circumstances outlined above and can include:

    • Current or former employees
    • Consultants
    • Vendors
    • Customers
    • Business Partners
    • Competitors
    • Others with connections to company insiders

    UNOFFICIAL RECRUITING
    Throughout your job search and career, networking is the name of the game. Social networking sites, personal and corporate blogs, career support groups and alumni networks are becoming better recognized as sources of information about unadvertised opportunities. Leads are passed among contacts along with recommendations and endorsements that result in introductions. In today’s competitive job market, networking has become the major recruiting method utilized by many hiring authorities.

    TAKE ACTION
    If you are not getting results from your job search efforts, it’s time to increase the time you spend identifying unadvertised jobs. It is not just what you know or even who you know but who knows what you know that can turn your search around. You have to offer prospective hiring authorities what they need and want, when they need it. It is important to stay on an employer’s radar, so that when changes create new opportunities, you will hear about them. Many individuals hired today have connected with their new employer through networking relationships.

    Your ability to tap in to the hidden job market throughout your career will greatly enhance the level of success you achieve.

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  • Message

    It is often the job seeker who asks the best questions who ends up obtaining a job offer. It is important to realize that the purpose of asking questions during a job interview is not to obtain more information for yourself. Questions are asked to uncover what is most important to each person involved in the interviewing process. Your goal is to have them envision you in the opportunity available so they pass your resume along vs. screening you out.

    Prior to asking questions, you want to express your high level of interest and confidence in performing the responsibilities of the job. You then ask questions which could include:

    • What is the greatest challenge your new hire will face?
    • What is most important to you, in the person you hire?
    • How can your new hire have the greatest impact on your department/team?
    • I am confident in my ability to do this job. Do you feel I have the skills and experience this job requires? (Note: Anything following the word “but” in their answer to this question represents the reason you could be screened out. If you are able to overcome any concerns they express, it brings you closer to possible a job offer.)

    Your goal in each step of the interview process is to be passed on to the next person. If the interviewer feels you are confident, interested and he or she likes you, more than likely you will get to the next step. Remember, if you let the interviewer talk about themselves they will like you more.

    Questions that are self-serving like benefits, salary, hours, days off etc. are the kiss of death in an interview. The more you learn about the priorities of each person, the better you can position yourself as their perfect hire!

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  • Message

    If you are not getting results from your job search efforts, it’s time to increase the time you spend identifying unadvertised jobs. It is not just what you know or even who you know but who knows what you know that can turn your search around.

    You have to offer prospective hiring authorities what they need and want, when they need it. That is why it is important to stay on an employer’s radar so that when changes create new opportunities, you will hear about them. Many individuals hired today have connected with their new employer through networking relationships.

    STRATEGY ONE: IDENTIFY TARGET COMPANIES
    Take time to conduct research to identify companies who offer the type of opportunities you are seeking. Conduct extensive research on these companies and read the Press and Media for current information.

    STRATEGY TWO: INITIATE CONTACT WITH HIRING AUTHORITIES
    If possible, obtain an introduction through a mutual contact such as a company insider, former or current employee, consultant etc.

    STRATEGY THREE: CREATE YOUR VALUE PROPOSITION
    Focus your conversation on the WIIFM <x{(}>(what’s in it for me) of the person you have targeted. Display your hard work ethic, expertise and core values to earn trust. When a need or problem surfaces you want to position yourself as the possible solution.

    STRATEGY FOUR: FOLLOW UP
    Encourage interaction beyond the first contact in order to establish trust. Send relevant information and share ideas in order to stay on the decision-maker’s radar. Promote a mutually beneficial relationship where both of you make an effort to remain helpful.

    These strategies will help you uncover hidden job leads when you are actively seeking a new job. Throughout your career, you want to position yourself so employers and recruiters find you for job opportunities they are attempting to fill.

    Develop your personal brand through your social networking sites, industry and professional association participation, writing relevant articles and blog posts and develop a personal website. Your ability to tap in to the hidden job market throughout your career will greatly enhance the level of success you achieve.

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  • Take time to review your social media presence. Hiring authorities and recruiters are increasingly utilizing social networks more and job boards less, which is why it is an important element of your job search process. Linkedin continues to dominate the social media networks that are used for recruiting efforts.

    Social media helps hiring authorities and recruiters research who you are, what you have accomplished as well as gain insight in to your personality. This helps them determine if you have not only the credentials they need, but if you would fit into their company culture. Often the review of your social media presence is your unofficial first interview.

    If you have applied for a specific opportunity, most hiring authorities and recruiters will review your social media presence before you are contacted. It’s important for you to know where they focus their attention when they are reviewing your profile:

    • Work History
    • Education
    • Industry Knowledge
    • Communication Skills <x{(}>(spelling, punctuation, grammar and ability to communicate effectively)
    • Hobbies
    • Interests
    • Use of Profanity
    • How you use your Non-Working Hours
    • Use of Alcohol or Illegal Substances

    When you review your exposure on social media sites, look at them through the eyes of a hiring authority. Based on what you read, does your information encourage a hiring authority or recruiter to contact you? If the answer is no, make a commitment to improve the information you are sharing on social media sites, to help improve the results of your job search.

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